Is There 'Absolute Truth'? Most Christian Kids Don't Think So

by Allie Martin

(AgapePress) A popular author and speaker says parents should be concerned about what their kids are tempted to believe.

Speaking at the recent meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention in Phoenix, Josh McDowell said values drive a youngster's behavior -- but their beliefs form their values. McDowell cited some shocking statistics revealing what most evangelical Christian youth believe about the concept of "absolute truth."

"In 1991, 52% of our born-again church kids said there is no absolute truth. In 1994, 62% said there is no absolute truth." McDowell continued: "In 1999, 78% of born-again church kids said there is no absolute truth. In 2002, 91% of our born-again church kids said there is no absolute truth.

"Do you know how staggering that is?" he asked. "The very basis on which we build our faith is truth -- and when we allow truth to erode, we gut the faith."

According to McDowell, children today are being influenced in large part by secular education and secular media. He said youngsters are exposed to 40 hour of secular education and 28 hours of secular entertainment each week. He says that is a major factor in the disregard for absolute truth among young people.

Also in his talk to Southern Baptists, McDowell stated his belief that the number-one problem facing America in the 21st century centers on a father's relationship with his children. He said the lack of the loving, connected relationships between dads and children drives many away from the church.

"We are losing our kids -- not because they're not hearing truth, but because we're not building loving, intimate, caring relationships with them," he said.

McDowell is author of Beyond Belief to Conviction: What you Need to Help Stand Strong in the Face of Today's Culture.

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